Anxiety Sensitivity and Daily Cigarette Smoking in Relation to Sleep Disturbances in Treatment-Seeking Smokers

Sleep disturbances are highly common, particularly among individuals with anxiety symptoms or disorders. In fact, sleep disturbances and anxiety influence each other: sleep problems can serve as a risk factor for the development of anxiety disorders and, conversely, anxiety disorders can contribute to problematic sleep. Anxiety sensitivity, the fear of …

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Psychometric properties of the Insomnia Catastrophizing Scale (ICS) in a large community sample

To catastrophize about poor sleep is likely something that everyone will encounter during episodes of sleep difficulties. The tendency to catastrophize about sleep disturbance and associated daytime consequences is particularly common among individuals with insomnia disorder. Due to a lack of self-report instruments designed to assess insomnia catastrophizing, we developed …

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Predictors of treatment attendance and adherence to treatment recommendations among individuals receiving Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia

Insomnia is very common, affecting up to 37% of adults, and is linked to a host of mental and physical health problems. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I) is recommended as the first line treatment for insomnia by the National Institutes of Health, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, and …

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The effects of safety behavior availability versus utilization on inhibitory learning during exposure

Exposure therapy is a highly effective treatment for anxiety disorders. This approach calls for individuals to remain in anxiety-provoking situations long enough to acquire threat-disconfirming information about the situation and build new safety associations. A commonly debated aspect of exposure delivery is the inclusion/exclusion of safety behaviors. Safety behaviors are …

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Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for the treatment of current depressive symptoms: A meta-analysis

Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy may help reduce current depression, but more long-term studies are needed. Depressive disorders are an extremely common category of mental health conditions around the world. Among all mental and substance use disorders, depression accounts for the largest proportion of disease burden (i.e., years that an individual lives …

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Why we should know more about dropout: Identifying change-dropout patterns can help to estimate treatment progress in internet interventions

In their scientific work, researchers rely on the data available to them to draw conclusions based on empirical results. However, when values are missing the interpretation of results can be difficult especially if it remains unknown what caused the dropout to occur. With regard to studies in clinical psychology, this …

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Materials used to support cognitive behavioural therapy for depression: A survey of therapists’ clinical practice and views

Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for depression and patients who learn skills in CBT seem less likely to relapse. Between-session tasks (‘homework’), where patients practise skills learnt during sessions with their therapist are an integral part of therapy. Doing homework outside of the therapy session is associated …

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Task-Shifting to Improve the Reach of Mental Health Interventions for Trauma Patients: Findings from a Pilot Study of Trauma Nurse Training in Patient-Centered Activity Scheduling for PTSD and Depression

Text by: Doyanne Darnell Each year in the U.S. 1.5-2.5 million people suffer traumatic injury requiring inpatient hospitalization. The nation’s trauma care system is highly effective in saving lives, being well-coordinated within geographic regions to provide a full continuum of medical care and responsive to best-practice guidelines based on up-to-date …

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